Monday, October 22, 2018

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1790 Redingote Inspiration and Percolation

Redingote, c. 1790, LACMA M2009.120
Friends, I haven't wanted to sew for awhile. Burn-out is a real thing, especially failing miserably on the last two 18th century gowns I tried to make (the irony). So I'm giving myself a break (in France) and letting the inspiration rekindle whenever it likes.

That being said, while I don't want to touch a needle and thread right this moment, I am thinking of new garments I'd like to make for next year. We have two trips/events planned for next year that will need some 18th century clothes, and with a grand total of two ensembles that still fit me (and you're all sick of that yellow dress, I know), it's time for something new.

I have a lot of fabric I've been marinating. One is an olive and buff striped taffeta that feels like a striped redingote. I made a redingote for my wedding gown 5 years ago and have always loved the style, so perhaps it's time for another.

Bless you, LACMA, for the many high resolution photos of this dress! Redingote, c. 1790, LACMA, M.2009.120
My silk isn't as interesting and varied as that used for the LACMA redingote, but it's reminiscent.

Wouldn't we love to stumble upon a silk like this someday? For now I have much simpler striped taffeta that will have to suffice. Redingote, c. 1790, LACMA, M.2009.120
LACMA published a gridded pattern for this garment a few years ago here. There is a PDF download with notes as well as the grid, which will be hugely helpful in draping and patterning.

I'll be sure to post progress photos as I go along later this year. <3
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10 comments:

  1. Omg I love that redingote! I can't wear those colors without looking ill, but the dress design and the varying patterns and textures are lovely.

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  2. DOOOO IT! And enjoy France! I'm in London in two days time, squee!!

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  3. Does this mean you aren't going to finish the robe a la bon bon?

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  4. Bienvenue en France! Have a good time and if you're in Paris, go to the Marché St Pierre and buy a lot of fabric! (Yes, I know I'm an evil enabler)

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  5. Wow, Lauren, thanks! My first question to you was going to be HOW did they get that perfectly aligned strip of trim at the lower collar edge, never imagining that it was a double collar, even tho I've seen that construction detail before -- but checking the gridded pattern I was able to see it was a collar stand and 2 stacked cape collars. Wow three layers of finished edges at that neckline means you must use lightweight fabrics for sure! Thanks for this and I will be cheering you onward. Have a great time in Paris and I hope you have found the inspiration for many more fabulous gowns, shoes and life!!

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    1. I love stacked collars! You could do this in superfine wool and leave the cut edges to eliminate the bulk. I would like to do a superfine habit some day and try this technique.

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  6. If you're going to be in the Loire Valley and have some time, I would love to treat you to a coffee :) I'm a fellow American (and an American Duchess fan) living near Orléans. I hope the weather stays good for your trip!

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    1. We are not passing that way this time but already I am in love with France and plan to come back!

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  7. Take care of you, and I hope you're enjoying your time in France (frenchy here \o)
    This is a woderful project that i will follow, I dream to make this dress for years

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