Wednesday, March 27, 2013

, ,

Restoring Antique Shoes - How to Polish Leather Shoes

Ever since I started collecting antique shoes, I've been a little obsessive about restoration, primarily bringing leather shoes back from the dead.  I look for the *worst* leather shoes on eBay and Etsy, just so I can resurrect their desiccated bodies and preserve them for the future.  It's oddly fun.

This brings me to the importance of caring for your leather shoes.  We live in a world where most of the shoes you own are constructed of man-made materials, but if you own a pair of leather American Duchess shoes, they're the real deal, and you will want to care for them so they last you for-flippin'-ever.

So without further ado, here is a video I put together on how to use the Angelus lustre cream and Angelus shoe wax I've stocked in the "Accessories" section of the shop.  In the video, I'm using an original Victorian button boot for my demo, and you can see the magical effects the goop has on it...



Just imagine if anyone had polished that lovely creature throughout its 100+ years of life - it would look new! (and so will your leather shoes, forever, if you use this stuff every once in awhile).

The goops in the video are:
Angelus Lustre Cream in Black (we also have it in neutral and red) 
Angelus Perfect Stain Shoe Wax in Black (also in neutral and red)
Share:

8 comments:

  1. Thanks for your tutorial as I think it will be helpful. Our family owns a lot of black leather shoes and boots so we will have to try the polish.

    Also, you might not realize this, but the music in the video is in the foreground (a little to loud) and it is drowning out your voice. If you could switch the two (for the next time), then it will be so much nicer!!

    Thanks again!!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks for the feedback - I think I got it worked out now how to get the audio louder than the music. I'm kinda fumbling through this, learning as I go!

      Delete
  2. This comment has been removed by the author.

    ReplyDelete
  3. Before you continue "restoring" your antique leather shoe collection, you might want to check out the following:

    http://www.cci-icc.gc.ca/publications/notes/8-2-eng.aspx

    http://www.nps.gov/museum/publications/conserveogram/09-01.pdf

    ReplyDelete
  4. This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.

    ReplyDelete
  5. This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.

    ReplyDelete