Wednesday, November 28, 2012

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V323: American Duchess Historical Holiday Gift Guide

Happy Holidays to all of you and yours!  'Tis the season for jolly times, being thankful, and giving lovely gifts to your dear ones.  Stumped on what to give to your historical costuming gems?  Well here are a few small, stocking-sized ideas...

1. Crochet Gloves from Amazon Drygoods - $15.95


These lovely little ladies' gloves are an excellent compliment to any Victorian ensemble.  Delightful and lacy, they add that little extra touch, while also being practical - no need to take them off for every little thing, as the fingerless feature allows full sense of touch, and anachronistic smartphone fiddling.  (Shhh! Don't tell!)

2. 18th Century Bath & Beauty Products from Litttle Bits Clothing Company - $3.00 - $10.00


She'll revel in sumptuous scents and period correct pampering products, with Litttle Bits' whole line of 18th century items, from rose tinted lip balm ($8.00) to lightly scented lavender powder ($10.00) perfect for powdering the hair as well as the face.  I have personally tried these products and loved them.  Try the Moon of Isis ($4.00) or Cinnamon an Ginger Lye Soap ($3.00), and the 18th Century Herbal Footbath ($10.00).  YUM.

3. Historic Neckerchiefs from Burnley & Trowbridge - $18.00


What better to fill the neckline of an 18th century gown than a period reproduction neckerchief?  Based on many extant examples, B&T's neckerchiefs are a fine, block-printed cotton, measuring approximately 34 inches square.  They come in a variety of colors and prints.

4. American Duchess Clocked Silk Stockings & Buckles - $25.00 - $40.00


Okay, I know these are my own products, but they really do make great gifts!  The stockings come in three color - the white is dyeable - with three different historical reproduction clocking designs.  They are 98% silk, with stretch at the tops to help keep them up.  Buy two or more and you get a discount.

We have three styles of authentic Georgian shoe buckles, all based on extant examples.  Two are of sparkly paste stones, one wrought silver in an appealing naturalistic design.  Purchase buckles with a pair of latchet shoes, and get a discount.

5. Historic Jewelry from K.Walters at the Sign of the Gray Horse - $15.00 +


Beautiful and authentic, Gray Horse pieces are exquisitely made, perfectly period, and will add that something special to gorgeous historical gown.  Plus, the proceeds from the sale of these items go to supporting Kim's rescue horses.  There are items for gentlemen and ladies alike, all of which have been researching and handmade.

6. 17th and 18th Century Velvet Patches from Ruby Raven - $20.00


The last perfectly period touch is a Ruby Raven Velvet Patch Kit, which includes a large selection of patches in different shapes, sizes, and colors, along with a small bottle of spirit gum to affix the patch.  Wear as few as one, or as many as suits your mood.  Ruby Raven's kits are handmade in Alameda, California, by a wonderful member of the costume community.  Get kits in "Classic," "Gothic," and "Halloween" themes.
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Happy Holidays!!
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5 comments:

  1. LOL! Those velvet patches are known as "les mouches" in French which means "the flies"...referring to flies flying about the face!

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  2. Do you know where we can order everything from? I noticed some recommendations had links but not all of them did...are all of them available over the internet or phone?

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    1. Hi Jessica - if you click the name/link beside the number in the list, it will take you to the websites where the items are sold. :-)

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    2. Thanks Lauren! I bought a pair of Kate's earrings at a fair this past September - I love them! So I am itching to get more!

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  3. Lovely roundup of gifts! I LOVE the jewelry - I may end up buying my own stocking stuffers. Oops! Just a little note - lacey fingerless gloves are only appropriate through the 1850s. By the 1860s they were only worn by old ladies. :D Not an issue if you just want the look, though! :) (They may have come back in in late Victorian years - I really don't know.)

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