Sunday, October 14, 2012

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V287: My 18th Century Pocket

So...I did make a pocket.  It only took me 7 months to complete because of my intrepid laziness when it comes to hand embroidery.


Luckily, flying on airplanes is a perfect time to embroider.  TSA allows scissors 4 inches or less, so I found some little Fiskars fold-ups at the craft store that worked perfectly, and packed all the pieces of the unfinished pocket into my carry-on.

It took me the whole two flights out to Virginia, but I got the thing done, binding, ties, and all, and was mighty grateful for it when it came time for playing dress-up.  Mom and I spent most of our be-costumed time digging around in our pockets for this or for that.


My pocket used the pattern from Colonial Williamsburg's Costume Close-Up: Clothing Construction and Pattern, 1750-1790 , except that I mirrored the pattern, whereas the original is not perfectly symmetrical.  I also deviated greatly from color scheme and material - the original is ugly crewelwork (in my opinion), and mine is done with regular ole embroidery floss, in pinks, greens, and yellows.  It's kindof "bright," but that's nothing a little dunk in a hot tea bath won't fix.

That's it, that's all, that's m'pocket. The end.
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12 comments:

  1. I say to keep your colors bright and clear. We are used to seeing Colonial objects after 200+ years of use and wear so they don't look new. As re-enactors we are supposed to look like our things were recently/newly made and should not yet have the patina of hundreds of years. Just my opinion, :)

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    1. I suppose it's best to let it age over time, if it will. I like to add patina to gowns an clothing items because I want them to feel lived in and authentic, but as just a pocket, I suppose it doesn't matter, nobody will see it!

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  2. That's so pretty! I wouldn't dunk it, it looks great as is! You're a fast embroiderer too! :-)

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  3. I've been toying with the idea of making a pocket, although it wouldn't be as pretty as yours. It amuses me that a lot of modern women's clothing is devoid of pockets, so creating a historical item such as this would actually help me out. Having said that, I want to change all my modern clothes to more historical inspired styles anyhow :P

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    1. You're right, we are low on pockets (usable, practical ones at least), though have the big purses to act in the same way. I'd rather shove it all in pockets, honestly.

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  4. This is so cool. You're just full of surprises. I didn't realize you were so adept at embroidery. Maybe you should try your hand at a stomacher some time.

    I do have a question. How did you eventually decide on the era of history that was your favorite to start making clothes for?

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    1. I wouldn't consider myself very good embroidery - maybe this design makes it look that way, but I'm terrible at satin stitch and don't even know how to do a French knot! I do think maybe I will try a stomacher at some point, though it might take me ages (years) to finish something more complex.

      For your question, I think maybe I will write up a blog post to answer. :-)

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  5. I think that Rachel has a good question - I would be interested in how you "found" your era. And seamstrix has a valid point about patina and age. Also, she has a great screen name. I know because that's my Yahoo handle. :) You really did a nice job on the embroidery, Lauren. What were the colors of the original?

    Katt

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    1. I think I will answer your and Rachel's question in a post. The original pocket is this one: http://emuseum.history.org/code/getimage.asp?filename=1963-11.jpg&type=full&mediatype=Image

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    2. The link above no longer works, but believe this to be the correct link now. http://emuseum.history.org/view/objects/asitem/classification@12/419/title-asc?t:state:flow=5bf7de50-0044-4ab1-95f5-2370cdda64fb

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