Tuesday, August 7, 2012

, , , ,

V220: The Parisian Gown - Finished!

Despite all the trouble this gown gave me, I'm so happy with how it turned out!  I certainly learned many a lesson about fabric choice, sleeve construction, and general patterning.  I'm ready to tackle the next project now, hopefully with less worries. :-)

I like how versatile a polonaise'd skirt can be - wear it up with a walking-length petticoat, or down with a full-length petticoat.  I don't have it pulled up all the way here, just a bit.
Historical Dog wanted to be in the photos, that is, until I tied a bow around her neck, then she wasn't so sure.
This photo shoot was for promoting the new clocked stocking line (you'll recognize the picture on the left from Facebook maybe).   Legs aside, I finally got a chance to wear the painted and be-ribboned Pemberlies I made ages ago, for this dress.
The Specifics:
1770s Robe a l'Anglaise
- Based on a gown in Janet Arnold, Patterns of Fashion 1: Englishwomen's Dresses & Their Construction C. 1660-1860
- Upholstery-weight silk stripe, paired with a silk shantung petticoat
- Worn over prow-front stays, small panniers, and one petticoat.
Stockings and Shoes from my line.

Share:

36 comments:

  1. That robe is just sooo beautiful! I can't believe someone is so talented in sewing clothes worn so much time ago. I mean it's amazingly original-looking! Just wooooow :)

    ReplyDelete
  2. This gown turned out beautifully! I love how you've styled yourself too. The photo shoot came out wonderfully! Gorgeous!

    ReplyDelete
  3. HISTORICAL DOG!!! Your dress turned out beautifully -- altho it was more work to make the bodice twice, I'm glad you did because V2 turned out so great! It was fun to have you at CoCo even if I only did get to see you briefly!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I really enjoyed your class on the Social History of Hair, Kendra. I look forward to taking more of your classes next year, too :-)

      Delete
    2. Next year, more shenanigans!

      Delete
  4. I love it! This may be one of my very favorite things you've ever done--it's just so wonderful!

    ReplyDelete
  5. Absolutely dazzling, you look beautiful! What apparel are you wearing under the gown to get the back so puffed out?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Tricia, for undies I am wearing stays, then a bum pad and small pocket hoops, The Ugly Puffer, a cotton petticoat, then the green petticoat. I know typically bum pads and panniers were not worn together, but the back seemed a little flat without the bum pad. The stripe fabric also has a lot of body in it, making for good poufage.

      Delete
  6. Wow!!! This dress is absolutely gorgeous! And I love the shot of you showing off your legs. That is seriously sexy! ;)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Scandal! haha, we needed to show the stockings, for promo :-D

      Delete
  7. It looked really lovely in person too, you styled it all so nicely.

    ReplyDelete
  8. Very lovely! (And tell the pup my pup approves of the bow! ;-) )

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I told Historical Dog. She is still not amused. She will be even less amused with I strap on a bowtie for this weekend's Gatsby event, tee hee :-)

      Delete
  9. AHHH! You look great! You inspire me to sew more!! Just moved to a new place and still settling in, so be on the look out for a line of little girls dress up 18th century gowns!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Excellent! I look forward to it :-)

      Delete
  10. It's glorious. The picture of the back skirts (at top) is so elegant! That draping is to die for.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you! I love the adjustability of skirts worn a la Polonaise - wear them long, short, down, up, however you feel :-)

      Delete
  11. Oh my goodness gracious...you've blown me away again! I love the soft colors and your hair and the stripes and oh, everything! Especially Historical Dog!

    I have the Janet Arnold book and it's so nice to see what these drawings might actually look like as real gowns. Thanks for sharing these pictures and your whole process!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks so much! I sortof went off in my own direction, away from Janet Arnold, but the pattern pieces are essentially the same. I think this JA pattern is a good one to start with, for an Anglaise, as it's not *too* crazy

      Delete
  12. I love it! And historical dog is adorable!

    ReplyDelete
  13. its even prettier in person & i didnt think that would be possible!!

    ReplyDelete
  14. Beautiful dresssssss, so precioussss!!! And your dog is such a cutie! Perfect photo shoot!
    Sabine

    ReplyDelete
  15. My friend loves your dog!
    And the big picture of you and historical dog, I think that looks so much like it could be a painting! I like the colors and the hair and everything... I
    'm jealous. :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Whoops. I
      'm renowned for not checking my typos.
      Haha, oops. :P

      Delete
    2. Haha, I'm terrible with the type-o's too, don't worry. Thank you for the compliments. I try to get Avi (historical dog) into more pictures, but she can be snarky about it, lol. Puppy treats usually do the trick :-)

      Delete
  16. It turned out so beautifully! I'm glad we were able to meet, if only briefly :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Likewise! I hope to have more of a chance to talk next year :-D

      Delete