Thursday, March 8, 2012

, , , ,

V68: Operations Petticoat: Two Finished 18th Century Petties

I finally finished two Georgian petticoats that seem to have taken me forever to do.

Petticoats are supposed to be easy, right?

Celadon green silk petticoat with pinked ruffle, sheer embroidered apron, silk stockings, and Kensington red leather shoes with buckles
It's the ruffles that take the longest.  There are a number of ways to do ruffles.  My favorite - the one that makes me less homicidal - is cord-gathering.  This involves sewing a channel somewhere into the ruffle yardage, and since I wanted a decorative, pinked top and bottom edge to the ruffle on this celadon green silk petti, I sewed narrow strips of muslin to the backside of the ruffle, to form the channel.  I didn't bother to hem these piece of cotton, as they won't show, and this petticoat will never be put through rigorous wash cycles.

The top and bottom edge of the ruffle are pinked with scalloped shears - the top is straight, but the bottom is vandyked.  Makes for a nice effect.  You can also see the muslin channel strips.
Here's how it looks all gathered up.  I also ran the steam iron over this lightly, to press the gathers down a bit - they're quite unruly when first gathered, and I wanted that "been flat in a trunk for 300 years look" lol.
If you don't need a decorative top edge, you can just fold the top of the ruffle yardage over and make that your channel, like on The Matelesse Petticoat of Suck.

A deep ruffle with the cord gathering at the very top edge - makes for a harder look.
After everything, I actually quite like how the Petticoat of Suck came out, but I've concluded that it's not my style, though I would like to try a matelesse petticoat again, san rufflage.

Both petticoats are shown with the red Kensingtons, so you can finally see how they look on on the foot.  Don't forget that Kensingtons are our new 18th century latchet shoe, come in black and red, and are on pre-order right now for $99 ($120) .  Fleur and Dauphine shoe buckles are also on sale for $35 ($40).
Share:

12 comments:

  1. What wonderful petticoats! I love the celadon one, it's very sweet and light, perfect for spring. :D

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you. I wish I'd bought more of the silk when it was on sale (it's all gone now, of course, argh!) - would have made a great gown to go with.

      Delete
  2. Gorgeous! Thanks for the tip on that technique of gathering ruffles too!

    ReplyDelete
  3. Just lovely... Is there some trick to keep the fabric from unravelling where it's pinked? I don't know about anyone else, but pinking doesn't stop fabric from disintegrating into its component threads, just slows it a bit for me. Even if the fabric has a pretty tight weave to it.


    ...Mmm buckles on sale...

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Marianne - pinking like this was only done on tightly woven silks, in the 18th c, more tightly woven than some silks are today. Cotton it's a no-no.

      It might be possible to dip some fabrics in fray check, or apply fraycheck just along the edge I've never had a big problem with pinked silk fabrics becoming too frayed, but I am always sure to trim any threads that are hanging off.

      Delete
  4. Lovely! The apron looks very pretty over the green. Are these part of your master 'plan'?

    ReplyDelete
  5. love the green petticoat, very pretty! quick question, which buckles are pictured with your red Kensingtons you're wearing? Thanks!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Sadievale - those are Fleurs (http://www.american-duchess.com/historic-shoe-buckles-accessories/fleur-18th-century-shoe-buckle-rhinestone)

      Delete
  6. I prefer the "divide and conquer" method of making ruffles, myself. It all looks very nice, and that green is a lovely color. I think the "petticoat of suck" ended up being pretty after all.

    ReplyDelete
  7. I have a ruffler foot attachment for my machine....makes ruffling quick and painless!

    ReplyDelete
  8. did you sew the matelesse yourself of is it pre-done on the fabric? it would definitely make it suck if you had to. glad i'm in this era for some things.

    ReplyDelete
  9. did you sew the matelesse yourself of is it pre-done on the fabric? it would definitely make it suck if you had to. glad i'm in this era for some things.

    ReplyDelete