Saturday, February 4, 2012

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V35: Starting on Fabric Stamping for Colonial Williamsburg

Yesterday I thought I'd try my hand at stamping the linen/cotton I bought for one of my Colonial Williamsburg jackets.
I don't have a ginormous fabric stretcher thing, so I smoothed the fabric out on my dining room table.
First things first, I gave the un-stamped fabric a good hot wash, and a good hot dry, to fully shrink it, then a good hot iron.  I then spread it out on the dining room table and measured out my spacing for the stamping, using an orange chalk pencil to mark a small dot where I would place the bottom of the stamp.  I went with a 2 inch space between motifs, and each line is offset from the one beside it, to create an overall "brick" pattern.

Then on to stamping.  I used a foam applicator to tamp the floral stamp with fabric paint.  This produced quite a lot of variation, and you can see the lines of the stamp around some of the flowers, in the close-up, but in a mass they are not noticeable.  It takes a certain technique to press hard enough and still avoid those lines - still learning :-).

In between the flowers I dabbed a red dot, using a paintbrush.  Simples :-).

'Course, I've accomplished.....about a 36" x 28" wide space so far, out of 2.5 yards of 60" wide fabric.  It certainly takes time, but I am very happy with the result so far.

You can see my mess-ups in the bottom right, where a detail in the tabletop caused a stamping flub.  That part will have to be avoided when doing the cuttng layout.

If you're new to my blog, you can read about my fabric stamps here.
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22 comments:

  1. Love it! It will look so elegant when it's made up!

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  2. crazy labor intensive, but it should look fantastic.

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  3. I admire your tenacity... I'd go crazy stamping all that fabric. Although, I do recall a certain project of making over 300 thank you cards that were black embossed once...

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  4. That is serious dedication. I'm impressed.

    Maybe you should branch out from shoes into selling reproduction fabric!

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    1. Might be something to consider for the future :-)

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  5. Wow! The variation in pigment looks very natural with the simple design. It looks fantastic.

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  6. It's wonderful, absolutely smileworthily wonderful and its flaws and foibles are exactly like the real thing would have, any why Spoonflower could never make one that was as credible! Can't wait to see the next stage!! SQUEE!!!

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    1. I like Spoonflower, but for something authentic-looking the hand stamping, with all the flaws, seemed like the way to go

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  7. Its just great. your stamping is proving to be well worth the effort and I am glad you are not getting hung up on the "imperfections" quite inspiring:)

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    1. I wouldn't recommend this method to perfectionistas. There is quite a lot of variation - could drive one crazy!

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  8. All I can say is this: You. have. so. much. patience!! It looks lovely!

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  9. I'm curious as to why you decided to stamp the yardage and not draw out your pattern pieces on the fabric and just stamp what you needed?

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    1. It made more sense to do the whole thing, to make sure everything was in straight lines. There is so little scrap from the tight cutting layouts, plus I have a lot of lines of trim I can get out of the scraps.

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  10. I think it turned out amazing! I can't wait to see it constructed!

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  11. Dear Lauren,
    It's working, it's working! Think it looks really neat, and look forward to seeing it made up.

    Hooray for forging ahead,

    Natalie

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  12. Awesome! How ambitious! It looks great!

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  13. Thank you all! There was a good discussion on Facebook about using a wire grid to mark, or a lightbox. The measuring and marking takes quite a lot of time, but then the stamping goes pretty quickly. This one-color, one-stamp is about as simple as it gets...I can only imagine when it starts to be two or more colors, and multiple stamps!

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  14. I can't wait to see what this fabric looks like as a gown! What beautiful work :D

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