Tuesday, September 22, 2015

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My Version of McCall 8641 - 1936 Skirt Pattern

My 1930s "Miss Fisher" skirt inspired by McCall 8641 from 1936
Continuing on with my Miss Fisher Capsule Wardrobe, I set to making a skirt from the navy blue wool gabardine I'm using as my base fabric.

I know the show is set in 1929 (so far), but a lot of Miss Fisher's wardrobe has a very mi-1930s flair to it, which I absolutely love. So instead of a '20s skirt, I went for something I felt would flatter me more, a basic, slim, straight 1930s skirt.

I didn't want it to be *too* plain, though, so I looked through the free search section of the Commercial Pattern Archive and found this 1936 McCall skirt pattern:

McCall 8641 - 1936

And, handily, the shapes for the pieces:

McCall 8641 - 1936 - pattern piece shapes

Easy enough! I already had a 1930s dress that I knew fit me, so I just traced off the pieces for the skirt, re-drew the seam lines on the front, and added the decorative button plackets and a waistband.

A simple 1930s straight silhouette, left long-ish at the hem (well below the knee). It'll go with everything!
A day later it was done. I'm quite happy with it, although if I were to make it again I would move the side-front seams and button placket closer together. It's just a bit wide on the front for my taste, but I'm not bothered enough to re-make the skirt.

The plackets are false, just folded fabric stitched down, with 5 buttons sewn on for decoration. This sort of embellishment is very common for 1930s clothing.
Despite looking a bit like a flight attendant, I enjoyed wearing the skirt with a simple white silk blouse, burgundy wool beret, and a pair of vintage '80s Zodiac oxfords I found in a thrift shop for $7.

A great pair of Zodiac brand leather oxfords, from the 1980s, found at Savers for a steal.
I'm over the discomfort of going out in public dressed in "old lady clothes" by now, and just enjoy feeling put together, especially in things I made myself and thrifted. :-) It's just smart!


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27 comments:

  1. Old lady clothes! Love it! Great job!

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    1. Haha, I was once asked by a college friend why I wore "old lady clothes" all the time. Bless him. :-)

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  2. I'm so glad that you mentioned COPA . I am subscribed to it and have saved a lot of pattern layouts of patterns that I want to enlarge and make. I'm glad that you did a 1930s skirt. I haven't gotten that far in the decade for skirts for 1930s yet. How hard was it to enlarge the line drawings?

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  3. I love it! The buttons definitely add a subtle decorative touch. Long skirts with blouses are my favourite "old lady" outfits, they're so versatile and elegant ;)

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  4. The skirt is to die for! And I love the shoes.

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  5. Love it! Just wondering if the skirt is lined?

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    1. I did not line the skirt, but I feel a little like I "cheated" for not doing so. A proper tailored skirt should be lined.

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  6. How do you get in and out of the skirt? I don't see an obvious opening.

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    1. There is a side zip. I'm not sure what the original pattern called for.

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  7. Oh what fun! The skirt is super darling and I love that you thrifted the shoes! They are fabulous! Can't wait to see more of the Miss Fisher wardrobe!
    Blessings!
    g

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  8. Your vintage inspired outfits are always classy, original and look great on you! Rock your "old lady" proudly, LOL! I love Miss Fisher! I've been binge watching her on Netflix all week! Talk about a fabulous wardrobe!

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  10. Add a long neck scarf, some silver bracelets, a chunky necklace and you will be styling!

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  11. Just lovely! One question, the sketch for the original pattern above looks like there is some flair to the skirt? Is that just the sketcher being flattering?
    Funnily enough, I used that same button treatment for a 1900 costume skirt (albeit longer!). On had the buttons up by the waistband, one has a single placket alongside the left knee. The director loves it! This looks super chic on you! And bound to influence some fashion trends in your fair city!
    Best,
    Nancy N

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  12. Oh that skirt is just darling!! It really does go with everything!!
    I'm going to give this Commercial Pattern Archive a look-see now, thanks!

    Carla, Tiny Angry Crafts

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  13. That's a lovely skirt, the placket detail is lovely. I have a fear of skirts, I can never get a fit/shape/style that is flattering... sigh. I don't think you look one bit stewardessy!! Great outfit, and the shoes of course ; darling :)

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  14. Foxy...

    I don't think you look old lady! I really think that thought has come about because of everything having superlow waists.... I like the high waisted look, it is so much more flattering to most shapes than low waisted!

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  15. "I like the high waisted look, it is so much more flattering to most shapes than low waisted!" I agree. My waistline pudge tends to be above the waist and I find low-waisted bottoms don't work for me. If I wore drop-waisted frocks they'd look like maternity dresses.

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