Monday, April 29, 2019

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A Little History of ... Hamilton / Schuyler 18th Century Shoes

New American Duchess "Hamilton" / "Schuyler" 18th Century Shoes for men and women.
Next in our line up of new men's (+ women's) styles are the beautiful "Hamilton" (mens) / "Schuyler" (womens) 18th century latchet shoes.

We based the Hamilton / Schuyler design on late 18th century examples in museums, such as this wonderful pair in The Met...

Shoes, late 18th century. The Met. 2002.537.2a,b These shoes are associated with William Cowper and are noted as being quite ordinary and typical of the time. 
...and, of course, the names were a given ;-).

This pair of men's court shoes from c. 1780 - 1800 are much fancier than the more common style from the same period, above. The Met, 2009.300.2179a,b 
Pair of shoes owned by Immanuel Kant. c. 1800. Staatliche Kunstsammlungen Dresden, i.0116.01
Gentlemen, you can wear these refined 18th century shoes for both day, evening, and formal occasions. They are sturdy enough for outdoor wear, with thick leather soles and a short, 1/2 inch heel. Pop any of our buckles on for various looks - we highly recommend the men's reproduction Dandridge buckles for a blingy late 18th century look.

Ladies, if you portray working class, cross-dress as a gentleman or soldier, or just want a low-heeled 18th century option, Schuyler is for you.

A very typical drawing of a working class woman wearing a simple pair of latchet shoes. Rather generic, low-heeled latchet shoes with varying sizes of buckles and latchet straps are shown throughout most of the 18th century - you could reasonably stretch the time period for Schuyler quite a ways for a working classic impression. Royal Collection Trust, Paul Sandby, after 1752. RL 14332
Hamilton - Men's sizes are 7 - 12 with half sizes and a men's standard D width.
Schuyler - Ladies' sizes are 6 - 10 with half sizes, and 11 in a women's standard B width.

There *is* crossover between sizes. You can translate the sizes using this handy chart here...


(example - if you normally wear a women's 9.5 extra wide, you can order a men's 8)






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4 comments:

  1. A question: Hamilton/Schuyler seem to come less high up over the instep (i.e., towards the ankle) than any of the historical models you show. Is that just an illusion from these pics, or a choice based on other models or modern feet and modern constraints, or—? Thanks!

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    1. Good point. The cut looks more like a loafer than what I'm used to seeing in 18th century depictions. Hmmm.

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    2. It's a design choice and why we date the Schuyler/Hamilton to later in the 18th century. The vamp on men's and women's shoes both go lower on the foot later in the century.

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    3. Thanks, Lauren! (They're lovely either way; I was just surprised when I saw them next to the historical models above.)

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