Thursday, July 12, 2012

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V194: More Robe a l'Anglaise Problem Solving

Just getting any idea of final look, with one panel of skirt pinned on, and some trim pinned to the CF - the trim will go around the neckline and down the front edges of the skirt, too.

Here is some more progress on the Robe a l'Anglaise I've been working on (or battling).

I started over from the last post.  There were just too many problems, the main one being the entirely too-short waist.  After re-measuring and adjusting the waist length on FrankenLilly (again), I dropped the waist on all the pattern pieces, and even then still had to add a shoulder strap extension.
Things pinned into place - the waist hasn't been finished yet, but will pull all the rumples out of the bodice once stretched and smoothed into the waist seam, and weight down by the skirt.
I learned that the reason version 1 of this bodice didn't close in front is because I did not factor any ease into my pattern, which when all made up with the medium-weight lining and outer fabric (never mind future boning additions), "shrunk" the bodice overall, making it too small.  Letting out the side and side-back seams only helped with the waist, and unfortunately wouldn't let the bust out.  Special thanks goes to Jennifer Rosbrugh for this article about "historical ease."
New back, with shoulder straps set way in.  No boning, or waste finishing yet.

So now the new bodice fits, but then it was on to the sleeves, another adventure in wasted fabric and obsessive 3 am basting.  I have learned SO much about sleeves and armscyes, and now there are indeed two sleeves on the bodice, and they do go on over my arms, but are still constricting.  I have much to learn about sleeves yet.

It's a sleeve, albeit a little tight over the front of the shoulder still.

So now it is on to getting the hooks and bars placed correctly (nope, no pinning fronts for me: not only do I not care for effect, but this fabric is very difficult to pin through), adding in some bodice stiffeners, including boning, and beginning the fun process of stretching and turning the waist under to get that perfect, smooth, tight fit.
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17 comments:

  1. looks lovely so far and I am sure the finished gown will be stunning! The stripes are a perfect choice.

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  2. That is looking fantastic! I love that deep point in the back.

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    1. thank you! I love that deep point too, and look forward to setting the skirt on just right to keep its integrity

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  3. It's looking great! And thanks for the link to the article.

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  4. As far as I was aware, hooks and bars also were period correct so you're not sacrificing much in the way of effect...unless Janet Arnold lied to me in Patterns of Fashion and in which case excuse me while I go sneakily re-do my anglaise. I just feel like pinning a closed-front like this never looks nice, there are always so many ugly wrinkles and puckers. Totally different matter on gowns with stomachers because the pins can be hidden by the robing, but ugh I think I would be reluctant to keep having to stab the fabric of a pretty gown like this over and over again! It is looking very lovely even with all your struggles!

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  5. I adore your sheer apron with the white embroidery. Did you make it yourself? If not, I'm dying for any hints as to where I might find something similar. I just don't have the patience for the hand embroidery.

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    1. I bought the tamboured net panel on Etsy, then fashioned it into an apron. I don't have the patience or the skill for that embroidery either!

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  6. It's looking very nice! I can't wait to see if finished. I really like the ruching on the center front.

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    1. Thanks. This will be the first gown I've done trimmed so..well, so much. I want to try serpentine trimmeries down the front of the skirt, too

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  7. I love the solution for the front of the bodice. It looks on purpose & not trying to cover up the seams.

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  8. Love the back, love the front, love the whole darn thing. Doesn't it feel GOOD when you finally get a difficult piece knocked into working order-- and it looks great!

    The miniature sacque of Doom and Hell has also reached that stage. The gown is finished, aside from putting in the customary arrangements to polonaise it. I need to re-do the trim on the petticoat, having made the mistake of thinking I could eyeball a straight line.

    Pictures will be posted when son is armtwisted into taking them. He's got the only camera I can use locked up in an underwater housing.

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    1. Well, I'm still struggling, certainly. It was kindof a slap in the face putting on the red Anglaise and being super comfy through the shoulders, and realizing that my sleeves are still so tight and binding on the new striped one. :-\ Not sure what to do about it, though.

      Hooray for forging ahead on your sacque! yes, please, photos when it's all said and done :-)

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  9. It looks so pretty! You are so talented! I can't wait to see it when it's finished.

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  10. Hi Lauren, I love it too - especially the long point at the back - beautiful. I have had the 'shoulders falling off' problem too and think its something to do with the stays - they pushed the bosom out - so the shoulders were held back a bit. I added an inch or so to the shoulder straps at the armscye only - not at the neck because it makes it gape. This changes the set of the body a bit but it works.

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    1. That makes PERFECT sense. I will try the trick to add to the armscye and not the rest of the neckline. I think that is part of my trouble in this, certainly.

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