Saturday, December 31, 2016

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My Last Project of 2016

1930s-inspired hooded wool bomber jacket.
It feels like I haven't sewn much this year. I certainly have lapsed on the blogging, which I greatly apologize for! Everything we've been stitching up since October has been for next year's 18th century sewing book and we can't share it, so it goes without saying that it's been very difficult to do anything other than that.

Luckily I had a couple days between Christmas and New Years "off," and I decided to make something for myself - a 1930s-inspired jacket. I love jackets and coats, and needed something cozy but with a short waist. I was inspired by the pullover in the bottom right of this 1930s Sears catalog page:

The inspiration jacket isn't really a jacket after all - it's a pullover with ribbed cuffs and band and a small collar. Adorbs!
I had some lovely plaid wool in the stash and a 1970s pattern that would serve as the base:

The pattern - Simplicity 5891 - and the fabric, a plaid melton.
The pattern, Simplicity 5891, was close-ish. I needed to adjust the waist measurement, which was easy to do with just two seams. I also wanted to convert the band and cuffs to ribbing, and add a hood.

My doodles and notes with adjustments and alterations.
The jacket shell went together easily. I took the time to do bound buttonholes, which came out a bit small. I'm not sure bound buttonholes were the best choice for this project, since the wool was so thick. If they'd been larger it would have been easier to work through them, but despite my mistakes at least I know they'll last a long time. I don't trust my stitched buttonholing technique!

Bound button holes - there's a lot more steps that come after this, so don't be deceived. They look nice, though.
The ribbing was both tricky and easy. The cuffs were a right royal pain but the band was surprisingly straightforward. The difficulties come from access on a modern machine, but I'm wont to think it's my technique that's in need of revision. Surely there's an easier way to do ribbed cuffs! For the band, I assembled it with the wool tab first, then applied it to the bodice. I added that little tab because I needed something sturdy to button to - you see this done in bomber jackets quite often.

The shell of the jacket assembled, waiting for the lining.
Lastly, the lining. I put the lining in by hand but only because I've never learned the proper way to do it by machine! I did some parts out of order - for instance, I should have stitched the lining of the sleeve at the cuff right-sides-together, then pulled it through and finished the armscye, instead of turning the lining and felling it to the cuff (what a pain!) - and it took me many hours to wrestle the lining in, but I won in the end.

Felling the lining in by hand. It took a long time, and my lining - a poly crepe - wasn't nice to sew.
I put a welt pocket in lining, since there was no room on the exterior for functional pockets (too short). This is the first time I'd ever done a pocket like this and I'm pleased with the result, though I see how to improve next time. I'm glad I took the time to add it, too, because it's the perfect place to stash my keys and phone on dog park days.

The "lips" of my interior pocket. These are made just like bound buttonholes, then the pocket back is applied. I used the instructions in the Vogue sewing book. This is my favorite part of the jacket, to be honest. 
All in all I'm very pleased with my last project of 2016, and happy that I carved out a little time to make something for myself that I will wear often. Wearing and loving something you made it one of the best feelings.

Cozy and cute - I've been living in this jacket since I finished it.
Happy New Year to you all! I look forward to your projects in 2017!
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23 comments:

  1. You are a wonder! The jacket is perfect on you and you look absolutely darling in it!

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  2. Happy new year. Can't wait for your 18th century sewing book to be published.

    Jean

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    Replies
    1. thank you! we have a lot of work left to do, but it's going to be great :-D

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  3. What a chic little jacket! It looks absolutely gorgeous and the colours suit you so well.

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  4. This is spectacular! I so wish I had your talent :) Happy New Year <3

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  5. Did you put the cuffs on after the arm seam was sewn? I have found with ribbing that it is sometimes easier to leave the seam (or at least several inches at the end) unsewn, attach the ribbing and then finish the seam.

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    1. I was using ribbing yardage and I wanted an enclosed seam allowance on the cuff, so I sewed it to the sleeve flat, then did the sleeve seam all the way down through the cuff, then folded the cuff up and that's where I had trouble with access. I hand back-stitched it to secure it. I think part of my problem is I didn't use the "stretch and sew" method, and I didn't put the lining in correctly either. Next time I'll brain it out (or YouTube, haha)

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  6. I wondered why I hadn't seen any sewing blogs from you. Thank you for reminding me.

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    Replies
    1. I know, it's been so bad! My New Year's Resolution is to blog more.

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  7. Fantastic! Very stylish and a wonderful example of modifying a pattern! I love that you tell what steps you would change next time; makes me feel a little less inept! Happy New Year!

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    Replies
    1. Thank you! Sometimes the modifications work...sometimes they don't, hahaha. This one played nice this time.

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  8. Such a chic little jacket, and I love those autumnal colors!

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  9. Too cute! And yes, LOVE the pocket!

    Caroline

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  10. Are those Converse runners. I hope so because that is awesome if so. The jacket goes without saying is amazing

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  11. Replies
    1. Not this time. These are Freddie's of Pinewood, an English brand, and I highly recommend them. I have tried several times to make jeans but in the end, none of them have worked out so I invested in two pairs of Freddie's and haven't looked back.

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  12. Your pocket looks great! I've been making a vest for my husband and trying welt pockets. I never seem to get the edges in the right place.

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